PenderBlog From The Pender Islands Of Canada

October 23, 2011

Watersheds critical

Filed under: Sustainable Living — Jocko @ 7:40 pm

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waterfall on the Buck Lake trail (photo: Jocko)

From the CRD (Capital Regional District) and PICA (Pender Islands Conservancy Association):

Protecting watersheds on the Pender Islands is critical.  These are our major resources for recharging our reservoirs and aquifers.

What is a watershed?

This is a geographic area where rain and snow-melt flowing water is collected into common water bodies such as rivers, streams, wetlands or lakes.  During the collection process some of the water percolates through the soil and recharges the aquifers.

The Shingle Creek Watershed.

The Shingle Creek watershed must be protected as soon as possible.  The window of opportunity to purchase this property is limited.  This watershed is the largest catchment recharge area on North Pender Island.  It feeds the creeks and aquifers supplying Buck Lake, South Otter Bay Road, Browning Harbour and most areas in between.

Where is this critical watershed?

The 17.4 hectare (43 acre) watershed portion of the 37.3 hectare (92.1 acre) total property is a part of the Shingle Creek drainage which extends from the western portion of Lively Peak Park to Shingle Bay.  The western boundary of the property shares important wetlands with the Roe Lake portion of the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve

Why is the protection of this watershed of major importance?

•  Watershed protection is the basic principle for incurring pure drinking water and security of its supply.

•  Shingle Creek is the major source of water for Buck Lake Reservoir from which Magic Lake Estates obtains its drinking water.

•  Sale of this sub-dividable property to a private developer could place the security of this water supply in jeopardy.  Preserving the tree canopy and ground cover slows the rate of precipitation run-off and filters out air-borne pollutants.

•  Permanent preservation of appropriate areas of the property by conservation covenants would secure the land in perpetuity.

•  An alternative emergency route from Magic Lake Estates through the property may also be possible.

How is the property to be purchased?

Various sources of funding are being explored such as grants and private donations.  However, no direct funding is available from neither the Federal Government nor the Provincial Government for the purchase of land specifically for watershed  protection.

It is proposed that a phased purchase of the total property take place over a two to three year period.

Now, we need your help, your ideas, and your support as individual members of this community.

This is our water supply; it needs our protection.

Get Involved

Contact:

CRD Southern Gulf Islands Regional Director, Ken Hancock:  (250) 629-6610  Email: directorsgi@crd.bc.ca or

PICA (250) 629-3099  Email: pica@gulfislands.com

This project is supported by the following community groups:

•  Capital Regional District (CRD)

•  Pender Islands Conservancy Association (PICA)

•  Magic Lake Water and Sewer Committee

•  Pender Islands Parks and Recreation Commission

•  North Pender Island Local Trust Committee

Let’s seize this unique opportunity… to protect the Shingle Creek Watershed, the Buck Lake Reservoir for Magic Lake Estates and secure acres of parkland for the Pender Islands.

2 Comments »

  1. i think you have your facts wrong, and i firmly believe this is a nother conservancy land grab.as an alternative route from magic lake i support that,but please don’t try to sell this as a water conservation idea because those trees drink up more water from the acquifer than any subdivision would,especialy if the rain water collected of off roofs were put back into the wells recharging the acguifer faster than normal percolation ,have you ever heard of a well of depression,well well well. on the bright side of the coin a road through there would also provide access to the park up there facillatating camping and an alternative route for cycling sincerly your shawn anderson

    Comment by shawn anderson — October 23, 2011 @ 8:48 pm

  2. This is a very important property purchase that I hope goes through. One benefit of a real estate slump is that there is less resistance from developers when creating conservation areas.

    Comment by Richard Fox — October 24, 2011 @ 12:01 am

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